Google is shutting down Spotlight Stories, its immersive movie studio

Donald Trump Played Role of Aviation Expert, Said Boeing 737s 'Sucked' Before Grounding Planes: Report
March 14, 2019
Telegram gained three million new customers throughout Facebook outage
March 14, 2019

Google is shutting down Spotlight Stories, its immersive movie studio

Google has introduced that it’s shutting down Spotlight Stories, its in-house movie studio centered on producing 360-degree movies for telephones. “Google Spotlight Stories is shutting its doors after over six years of making stories and putting them on phones, on screens, in VR, and anywhere else we could get away with it,” reads a press release given to Variety by Google.

It’s been a busy six years for the studio, which has released 13 films over its comparatively quick life. These have included tie ins with The Simpsons and the Wes Anderson movie Isle of Dogs, in addition to unique movies comparable to Help (from Fast and the Furious director Justin Lin), Aardman Animation’s Special Delivery, and Pearl — which was nominated for Best Animated Short Film on the 2017 Academy Awards.

Google declined to say why it’s shuttering the studio, however in a press release given to The Verge mentioned it was pleased with the work accomplished by the group over the studio’s lifetime.

“Since its inception, Spotlight Stories strove to re-imagine VR storytelling. From ambitious shorts like Son of Jaguar, Sonaria and Back to The Moon to critical acclaim for Pearl (Emmy winner and first-ever VR film nominated for an Oscar) the Spotlight Stories team left a lasting impact on immersive storytelling. We are proud of the work the team has done over the years.”

Variety experiences that the studio’s everlasting staff are anticipated to be provided different roles inside Google.

Spotlight Stories initially started as a group inside Motorola producing 360-videos unique to the producer’s Android telephones, however turned a part of Google after the corporate’s $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola in 2011. In 2015, the studio’s movies turned extra broadly out there after its app got here to non-Motorola Android units, iOS, and YouTube’s 360-degree movie platform.

Comments are closed.