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Scientists ‘Resurrect’ the Ancient Gene That Gave Rise to the Deadliest Disease in History

The ancient gene that gave rise to the deadliest disease in history has been "resurrected" by scientists, allowing them to work out the series of events that led to the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum infecting humans.

Food Animals Are More and More Resistant to Antibiotics, Study Shows, Which Could Hurt the People That Eat Them

Antimicrobial resistance in animals grown for food in low to medium income countries has nearly tripled since the year 2000, according to a recent study in Science Magazine. Chickens and pigs have shown a marked increase in resistant strains of bacteria.

Bacterial Disease That Spreads From Animals to Humans Reported in U.S. Dogs

Leptospirosis, a disease that has recently been reported in Oklahoma and Utah, can be spread from animals to humans, particularly if you own a pet dog.

Blind people have increased opportunities, but employers’ perceptions are still a barrier

Communities across the world observe White Cane Day on Oct. 15 to recognize the contributions of people with blindness and low vision and to promote equal opportunities. The day was first observed in the U.S. in 1964, when Congress passed a law to increase awareness about the white cane’s role in promoting independent, safe travel for people with blindness or low vision.

Stressed Pregnant Women Less Likely to Have Boys: ‘The Womb Is an Influential First Home’

Stressed pregnant women are less likely to give birth to boys, according to researchers who investigated how a mother's health can affect their child.

Rare, Incurable Skin Hardening Condition Leaves Woman Struggling to Eat, Breathe and Walk

A former beautician has spoken of how a rare condition which causes her body tissue to harden has left her struggling to do daily tasks like eating or brushing her teeth.

Blind people have increased opportunities, but employers are still biased

Communities across the world observe White Cane Day on Oct. 15 to recognize the contributions of people with blindness and low vision and to promote equal opportunities. The day was first observed in the U.S. in 1964, when Congress passed a law to increase awareness about the white cane’s role in promoting independent, safe travel for people with blindness or low vision.

Study Claiming He Jiankui’s Gene-Edited Babies May Face Earlier Death Retracted by Major Scientific Journal

One of the world's leading scientific journals has retracted a study that said the first gene-edited babies may have a lower life expectancy as a result of He Jiankui's experiments. The paper, published inNature Medicine, was retracted by the authors, following correspondence with other researchers who flagged problems in the data they used for their conclusions.